Indoor & Outdoor Allergy Test
$199
Indoor & Outdoor Allergy Test
$199

Test for 40 common indoor and outdoor allergens

Not sure what’s causing your uncomfortable symptoms like an itchy throat, watery eyes, and sneezing? Test your response to indoor and outdoor allergens, including pets, trees, grasses, dust mites, and more with this simple home collection test.
Measures
14 trees, 9 weeds, 7 grasses, 4 molds, 2 dust mites, 2 pet allergens, 2 pests
Collection Method
Red icon of a blood drop to represent finger prick collection methodFinger Prick Blood
Indoor & Outdoor Allergy Test Kit
For a limited time, take $40 off your test with code TAKE40. Offer ends on 9/25.
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What's Measured
Bermuda Grass
Rye Grass
Sweet Vernal Grass
Orchard Grass
Timothy Grass
Kentucky Bluegrass
Johnson Grass
Box Elder
Birch Tree
Beech Tree
Oak Tree
Elm Tree
Olive Tree
Walnut Tree
Plane Tree
Poplar Tree
Acacia Tree
Mulberry Tree
Willow Tree
White Pine
White Ash
Common Ragweed
Mugwort
English Plantain
Goosefoot
Russian Thistle
Rough Pigweed
Sagebrush
Sorrel
Nettle
Mold (P. nota)
Mold (C. herb)
Mold (A. fumi)
Mold (A. alte)
Dog Dander
Cat Dander
German Cockroach
Mouse Urine Proteins
Dust mite (D. fari)
Dust mite (D. pter)
How it Works
alt text goes here Once you order, the test materials are delivered to your doorstep.
alt text goes here Enter the unique kit ID included with your kit at Everlywell.com.
1 Complete a simple finger prick collection and return with prepaid shipping.
1 An independent board-certified physician will review your results.
1 Once verified, you’ll receive your results on our secure platform within days.
What's Included
Gauze and bandages
Finger prick blood card for collecting your blood sample
Single-use Lancets for pricking your finger
Detailed directions to guide you
Pre-paid shipping both ways
Biohazard bag for returning your sample
Help along the way if you need it
Alcohol pad for cleaning your finger
Your Results
Easy to Understand
Gain meaningful insights about your health with easy-to-understand test results. Download and share with your healthcare provider, family, or friends. We also provide you with additional resources and helpful tips along the way.
Personalized
View a personalized report of each allergen tested as well as detailed information about what your results mean for you.
Actionable
Take action on your health and wellness. Use your report to help guide your next steps. Set up a discussion with a healthcare professional to go over your results further.
Why Everlywell

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Dive Deeper

Anyone experiencing symptoms such as a stuffy nose, sneezing, shortness of breath, watery or itchy eyes, coughing, skin rashes, fatigue, or headaches should consider this test. Many people suffer from allergies without knowing it, and allergy symptoms can be similar to common cold symptoms, so it can be difficult to tell them apart. In fact, allergies are the sixth leading cause of chronic illness in the United States, with more than 50 million Americans experiencing various types of allergies a year. Although pollen and pet dander tend to be among the most well-known and prevalent allergy triggers, there are many other allergens to watch out for—including molds and household pests. If you have a known allergy and are on an immunotherapy treatment plan, retesting for allergies can also help you see if your IgE levels have decreased over time.

If you’re experiencing severe symptoms, such as hives, fever, or vomiting, we recommend you speak with your healthcare provider right away.

This test measures your body’s Immunoglobulin E (IgE) reactivity to 40 common indoor and outdoor allergens. It does not test for food allergies or food sensitivities. Your results will show your reactivity level to each allergen on a scale from very low to very high. Although reactivity level can’t predict how you will respond to the allergen, this information is a good step toward understanding which allergens may be causing unwanted symptoms, so you can better prepare for the season and reduce allergen exposure in your home.

When your body is exposed to something it recognizes as threatening, such as a virus or bacteria, (also known as an offender) IgE antibodies in your body will bind to cells that contain histamine. Histamine is a chemical that gets released from your cells when there is continued exposure to a virus or bacteria, and it can cause symptoms of an allergic response—such as sneezing, coughing, and watery or itchy eyes.

Sometimes, your body can mistake substances like pollen or dander as an “offender,” which will then trigger the same chemical reaction that releases histamine.

Allergies can be mild or severe, seasonal, or year-round, all depending on the frequency and amount of your exposure to the allergens.

There are two standard ways to test for allergies: a skin prick test or a blood test. For a skin prick test, an allergist pricks your skin with allergens in different places to see how you react to each allergen. A blood test, also known as a RAST (Radio-Allergo-Sorbent Test), measures the IgE antibody concentrations in your blood.

The skin prick test is generally known to be less expensive than a blood sample test, but the expense may depend on your health insurance coverage. Skin prick tests can cost between $300–$600, while a blood test can cost up to $1,000.

Traditionally, both a skin prick and a blood test have required a visit to a physician’s office. The skin prick test cannot be done without a physician because an immediate reaction could occur if you’re allergic to any of the allergens included on the test. Another limitation of the skin prick is that you can’t be on antihistamines prior to testing because antihistamines block the physical response that occurs when you’re exposed to an allergen, which is ultimately what a skin prick test is trying to measure. This type of testing also isn’t ideal if you have skin issues, such as eczema, because it limits where your skin can be pricked.

A blood test is a great alternative if you routinely take medications to alleviate allergy symptoms or want to avoid the discomfort that can come with a skin prick test. Our test offers an added convenience; you can measure your IgE levels without having to go to your doctor’s office. The laboratory will test your blood sample against different allergens and measure the amount (or concentration) of antibodies produced. Taking antihistamines won’t affect your test results because the test measures antibodies levels, not how your body physically reacts. A blood test is also less invasive compared to the skin prick test because you won’t be directly exposed to the allergens. Although reactivity level can’t predict how you will respond to the allergen, this information is a good step toward understanding which allergens may be causing unwanted symptoms, so you can better prepare for the season and reduce allergen exposure in your home.

Our at-home test is comparable to the standard RAST blood allergy testing described above. This is a great option if you would want to test your IgE levels from the convenience of your own home. Many of the allergens included on this panel are among the most common indoor and outdoor allergens in the United States. Although reactivity level can’t predict how you will respond to the allergen, this information is a good step toward understanding which allergens may be causing unwanted symptoms, so you can better prepare for the season or make improvements to your home.

This indoor & outdoor allergy test kit measures your immunoglobulin E (IgE) reactivity to certain indoor and outdoor allergens. This test does not measure your response to foods. The immune response associated with these allergens is known to cause cold-like symptoms, such as a runny nose, itchy eyes, cough, or headaches. Although reactivity level can’t predict how you will respond to the allergen, this information is a good step toward understanding which allergens may be causing unwanted symptoms, so you can better prepare for the season or make improvements to your home.

Tests for food sensitivity measure your immunoglobulin G (IgG) reactivity to certain foods. IgG reactivity is a type of immune response that typically causes delayed, non-life-threatening symptoms. Food sensitivity testing with IgG antibodies can help you identify foods to target in a temporary elimination diet.

Food allergy testing kits measure your immunoglobulin E (IgE) reactivity to certain foods. The immune response associated with food allergens can be life-threatening because symptoms are typically associated with the digestive system. Symptoms can include swelling of the lips, tongue, mouth, or throat, trouble breathing, or even anaphylactic shock. This type of testing is typically performed under the care of a physician due to the serious nature of the immune responses that can occur. In severe cases, treatment may require a prescription.

Testing for food intolerance can involve an elimination diet and/or breath tests. An intolerance occurs when your body doesn't have enough of the right enzymes needed to break down a particular food.

Your results will show your level of IgE reactivity to each of the 40 allergens tested on this panel. Your results will be categorized from very low to very high, with helpful information about each allergen included in the test and advice about possible next steps. Although reactivity level can’t predict how you will respond to the allergen, this information is a good step toward understanding which allergens may be causing unwanted symptoms, so you can better prepare for the season or make improvements to your home.

This test alone cannot diagnose an allergy. All allergy tests must be interpreted in conjunction with symptoms and clinical history. This test is a great way to start a conversation with your healthcare provider to discuss next steps.