Woman on laptop looking up what happens if you test positive for an STD

Testing with us? Here’s what happens if you test positive for an STD

If you’re coming to Everlywell to gain insight on your STD status, we want you to know we’re committed to supporting you through the entire testing journey — which means providing you with support as you navigate any positive or abnormal results.

Testing with us allows you take proactive control over your sexual health by providing you with digital reuslts you’re able to easily share with any partners, but the process doesn’t stop with getting your digital results.

RELATED: How to have sex after an STD diagnosis, according to an expert

If the results of our sexual health tests indicate an abnormal or a positive result for a sexually transmitted infection, a board-certified physician will contact you to talk through next steps and in some cases, prescribe treatment when needed and applicable, at no extra cost.

Below, learn more about what follow up may look like for each of our sexual health options.


Trichomoniasis

Trichomoniasis (or “trich”) is a very common infection caused by a protozoan parasite called Trichomonas vaginalis. This at-home lab test checks for the sexually transmitted infection trichomoniasis and if abnormal results are detected, you’ll have the opportunity to connect with our independent physician network and may receive treatment, if appropriate.

According to the CDC, trichomoniasis is more easily contracted by people with vaginas, but it can be infectious in and transmitted across all sexes.

The trich parasite, a microscopic organism called a protozoan, typically lives in the lower genital tract (the vagina, cervix, urethra, or rectum) and can be spread from penis to vagina or, more rarely, from vagina to penis.

About 70% of people infected with trich have no symptoms, so it’s easy for it to go undiagnosed. Without treatment, the infection can persist for months or even years. Trich can make sex uncomfortable and can also put you at greater risk for contracting other STDs.

Trich is easily cured with antibiotic medications, but early detection and treatment are essential.

The CDC recommends being tested at least once a year and ideally before you have sex with a new partner. If you have multiple sexual partners or have sex without a condom (outside of a long-term, mutually monogamous relationship with a partner who has tested negative), it’s smart to test more often—every 3–6 months.

Shop the Trichomoniasis Test here.

Chlamydia and Gonorrhea

Both chlamydia and gonorrhea are very common sexually transmitted infection that can be treated with antibiotics. If your results from this test are abnormal, you’ll have the opportunity to connect with our independent physician network at no additional cost to discuss your particular case and may receive treatment, if applicable.

This test checks specifically for the presence of chlamydia and/or gonorrhea in the vagina and cervix. The vaginal swab used for this test cannot rule out infections in other areas of the body, such as the mouth, throat, or rectum. If you believe you may be infected in one of these areas, it’s important to see your healthcare provider for appropriate testing.

A negative test may need to be repeated in a few weeks if you’re concerned about recent exposure, or if you begin showing new symptoms. This is because very recent exposures may not yet show up on this test. And regardless of your result, it’s important to talk to your healthcare provider if you’re experiencing any symptoms of an STI or if you think you may have been exposed recently.

Most people with chlamydia or gonorrhea have no symptoms, which means they’re less likely to get tested and seek treatment. This means infections can go undiagnosed for long periods of time, which can lead to complications such as pelvic inflammatory disease, or transmission of infections from pregnant people to their children, so it’s important to stay informed about your status.

Early detection and treatment of chlamydia and gonorrhea mean that the infections are easily cured.

The CDC recommends being tested for chlamydia and gonorrhea at least once a year, or more frequently (every 3–6 months) if you’re sexually active and not in a long-term, mutually monogamous relationship with a partner who has tested negative.

Shop the Chlamydia & Gonorrhea Test here.

Hepatitis C

This test is used to detect the presence or absence of Immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies to the hepatitis C virus (HCV).Your test results will tell you whether or not you have been infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV). In the event that your test results are abnormal, you’ll have the opportunity to connect with our independent physician network at no additional cost to discuss your particular case.

While the hepatitis C virus (HCV) can be sexually transmitted, it’s more commonly spread through exposure to infected blood (such as sharing needles or getting a tattoo with unsterilized equipment).

An estimated 2.4 million people in the U.S. live with hepatitis C, and 3 out of 4 were born during the “Boomer” generation (1945–1965). In fact, Boomers are five times more likely to have hepatitis C than people of any other generation, possibly due to exposure to clotting factor concentrates made before 1987 or blood transfusions before 1992, when the introduction of widespread screening measures virtually eliminated the virus from the medical blood supply. You can learn more about this from the CDC.

If you think you may have been exposed to hepatitis C, it is recommended that you talk with a healthcare professional. The CDC recommends screening at least once for hepatitis C if you were born between 1945 and 1965. The CDC also recommends screening for hepatitis C if you’re currently injecting drugs or have ever injected drugs, if you’ve ever received a blood transfusion or organ transplant (especially before 1992), or if you’ve ever had a medical condition that required clotting factor concentrates.

And if your risk factors change or you know you’ve been exposed to HCV, you should repeat screening immediately, as well as notify your healthcare provider.

Shop the Hepatitis C Test here.

Syphilis

Syphilis is a bacterial infection caused by the bacterium Treponema pallidum and these antibodies remain in your system even after syphilis has been treated. Your test results will show if syphilis antibodies were detected in your sample.

This test is a treponemal test, which means that it can be used to differentiate between an active syphilis infection and a successfully treated syphilis infection. In the event that your test results are abnormal, you’ll have the opportunity to connect with our independent physician network at no additional cost to discuss your particular case.

Caused by the bacteria Treponema pallidum, syphilis used to be a rare STI but has become more common since 2005. It’s spread through direct content with a syphilis sore (which is often the first sign of infection) during vaginal, anal, or oral sex. While correct use of a latex or polyurethane condom can help prevent infection, syphilis sores sometimes occur in areas not covered by a condom.

Syphilis is curable with antibiotic medication, but early detection and medication are crucial. Because initial symptoms aren’t always recognized and are generally followed by a long period of time without symptoms (called a latent phase), syphilis can progress to a very serious disease that can cause severe medical problems or even death.

Having syphilis can also increase your risk of contracting and transmitting HIV, so it’s super important to be tested regularly if you’re sexually active. The CDC recommends being tested at least once a year, or every 3–6 months if you have multiple sexual partners or sex without a condom outside of a long-term, mutually monogamous relationship with a partner who has tested negative.

Shop the Syphilis Test here.

HIV

HIV, or human immunodeficiency virus, is a virus spread via exposure to bodily fluids, such as sexual intercourse or blood exposure. Your test results will tell you whether or not IgG (Immunoglobulin G) antibodies and p24 antigen combination was detected in your sample.

Although testing includes a differentiation between HIV-1 and HIV-2, a single qualitative result is reported for clinical evaluation. In the event that your test results are abnormal, you’ll have the opportunity to connect with our physician network at no additional cost to discuss your particular case.

An estimated 1.1 million people live with HIV in the U.S. today, and 1 in 7 (about 15%) are unaware that they’re infected.

This test checks for the HIV antigen called p24 plus antibodies against two strains of HIV: HIV 1 and 2. HIV 1 is the most widespread strain worldwide; HIV 2 is less prevalent.

HIV can be spread only through sexual intercourse (contact with infected bodily fluids), exposure to infected blood (such as sharing needles or getting a tattoo with unsterilized equipment), or from pregnant people who transfer the virus to their unborn children. It cannot be spread through saliva or casual contact like shaking hands, hugging, sitting next to someone, or sharing a towel.

Though no vaccine is available for HIV, there are daily medications (such as PrEP) that can help to lower your chances of infection if you are at a higher risk. Talk to your healthcare provider about any preventive treatment options that may be available to you.

The CDC recommends being tested for HIV at least once a year, depending on your risk factors, and ideally before you have sex with a new partner. If you have multiple sexual partners or have sex without a barrier method such as a condom (outside of a long-term, mutually monogamous relationship with a partner who has tested negative), it’s smart to test more often—every 3–6 months.

Shop the HIV Test here.

STD

Your test results will tell you whether or not you test positive for any of six common sexually transmitted infections included in our comprehensive STD test. If your results are abnormal, you’ll have the opportunity to connect with our independent physician network at no additional cost to discuss your particular case and may receive treatment, if applicable.

The Everlywell STD test specifically looks for the following sexually transmitted infections:

  • Chlamydia
  • Gonorrhea
  • Trichomoniasis
  • Syphilis
  • Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)
  • Hepatitis C virus (HCV)

The CDC recommends more frequent screenings for young adults (<24 years of age), and others in populations with higher risk factors such as people who inject drugs, people with an STI, and any men who have sex with men.

Shop the Female STD Test and Male STD Test here.


Blog STDTesting Internal

Our suite of at-home lab tests makes it possible to check on your sexual health status all with your privacy in mind. All tests are delivered in discreet packaging which you’ll ship back to a lab to be processed, and you’ll receive your digital results directly, so you can prioritize your sexual health with the peace of mind and privacy you deserve.


A sex expert explains ethical non-monogamy and how to protect yourself and others if you practice it

Sex Ed for Grown-Ups with Jonathan Van Ness

How to have sex after an STD diagnosis, according to an expert

What is HPV and How Is It Transmitted?

The complete checklist to prepare for your next doctor’s appointment

Everlywell makes lab testing easy and convenient with at-home collection and digital results in days. Learn More