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Why routine lab testing for heart disease matters

Cardiovascular disease statistics are not for the faint of heart. Heart disease is the leading cause of death among Americans, with 47% of adults in the U.S. having at least one of three key risk factors: hypertension, high LDL, and smoking.

Fortunately, heart disease is preventable. In fact, according to the CDC, 200,000 deaths caused by heart disease and stroke each year are avoidable.

Studies suggest that routine lab testing and lifestyle changes can help prevent heart disease. By consistently measuring your cholesterol, LDL, HDL, and triglycerides, you’re keeping an eye on cardiac risks. The American Heart Association recommends that all adults 20 years or older have their cholesterol checked every 4–6 years. It could be more often if there's a family history of heart disease or high cholesterol.

Routine labs also help prevent silent surprise risks. Take high cholesterol, for instance. It doesn't have any symptoms, so many people don't know when their levels are high: 95 million adults in the U.S. alone have high cholesterol.

We make it easy for you to test levels from the comfort of your home to make preventive testing more convenient. Because when it comes to matters of the heart, routine checks will help you get a read on heart health and avoid becoming a statistic.


Use the Everlywell at-home Heart Health Test to easily check your cholesterol, HbA1c (an indicator of blood sugar levels), and hs-CRP (an inflammation marker)—which play key roles in heart disease risk.


References

1. How and When to Have Your Cholesterol Checked. (2018, September 7). Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/features/cholesterol-screenings/index.html

2. Vital Signs: Preventable Deaths from Heart Disease & Stroke (2013, March 14) Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/dhdsp/vital_signs.htm

3. American Heart Association (2003, December 19) Retrieved from https://www.heart.org/

4. Women and Heart Disease. (2020, January 31). Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/heartdisease/women.htm