Everlywell makes lab testing easy and convenient with at-home collection and digital results in days. Learn More

You could be at risk of diabetes and not even know it

The American Diabetes Association recommends people with prediabetes get their hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) tested at least once a year [1].

The problem is, many Americans with prediabetes don’t know they have it. Though 1 in 3 American adults have prediabetes, more than 80% who have it don’t know they do because they’re not experiencing any symptoms [2].


HbA1c, also known as “glycated hemoglobin,” is an indicator of your average blood sugar level over the past 2–3 months.

Prediabetes takes place when your blood sugar level is above the normal range, but not quite in the diabetic range. It significantly increases your risk of developing type 2 diabetes—the seventh leading cause of death in the United States [3]. Prediabetes also raises your risk of heart disease and stroke.

Fortunately, testing to see if you have prediabetes is simple with our at-home HbA1c test.

If you have prediabetes, testing your HbA1c at least once a year is important because it can help you keep track of your blood sugar level to ensure it doesn't creep into the diabetic range. Maintaining a healthy weight and regular physical activity (about 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week) can also help reduce your blood sugar level [2, 4].

Take action to prevent diabetes. Regular HbA1c testing is a key step you can take to help stay on top of your blood sugar level and even reverse prediabetes.

Plus, we make routine testing easy. Check your HbA1c level from the convenience of home with the Everlywell HbA1c Test. To monitor your levels on a regular basis, try our subscription option to automatically receive an HbA1c test on a schedule you choose.


References

1. Prevention or Delay of Type 2 Diabetes: Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes—2019. American Diabetes Association. https://doi.org/10.2337/dc19-S003. Published 2019. Accessed February 28, 2020.

2. Prediabetes: Your Chance to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/basics/prediabetes.html. Accessed February 28, 2020.

3. Alvarez S, Algotar A. Prediabetes. StatPearls. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK459332/. Published 2019. Accessed February 28, 2020.

4. Evert A, Dennison M, Gardner C, Garvey W, et al. Nutrition Therapy for Adults With Diabetes or Prediabetes: A Consensus Report. Diabetes Care. 2019;42(5):731-754.